If you facilitate meetings on a regular basis you know these moments of silence. Silence in conversations is a tool, indicator, helper. But I don’t mean the good silence…

Due to the remote setup, a lot of us are working in there is a new kind of silence in meetings. Its the silence that happens if you are on a video conference system and everybody is muted while writing down ideas on virtual sticky notes. Or do the voting in retrospective. Its this silence you do not have, if you are co-located in the same room. …


In my last article I outlined what companies need to do, if they are forced to switch to remote work due to emergency situations like quarantine. In the follow up discussions I was asked a lot about the specific rule sets I used in the past. So here it/they come(s).

First the best practice rules. Below I will comment on the reasoning behind each point. Some are obvious, some may not. Also: for setting up a long term remote implementation, there are likely more things to consider in the rules from a more administrative standpoint. …


I really do not like the panic that is spread at the moment around COVID-19. However the actions that are taken to stop the spreading are right. Therefore in some countries parts or whole cities are under quarantine.

The question is: How can you prepare your organisation for a remote setup, if you are in an area which could be affected by quarantine soon?

Easy if you are an organisation that already has remote working incorporated. But if you haven’t, or just starting out with remote, this article is for you. Also even if you have something like a mobile…


I participated in a lot of training and courses around the art of Agile, with all different kinds of flavour. Over the years it had been (and still is) a great journey.

But I noticed one interesting thing: All Agile frameworks and methods are fundamentally about changing the way of work. But rarely anybody in Agile education talks about change management… (at least I did not encounter the topic anywhere explicitly). And yes, I mean plain old style Change Management. I am wondering why.

Simply said all Agile transformations take place as part of a bigger change process or they…


The retrospective is the most important event within the Scrum framework. And in general agile methodologies use retrospectives to improve over time.

Why is this? The whole idea behind Scrum is based on inspect-and-adapt cycles. The retrospective it the event where the just finished sprint is reviewed team internally to generate insights. Thus you can identify the problems and generate ideas on how to improve the process for the next sprint (see the links below for a Scrum introduction). Without the retrospective, the inspect-and-adapt cycle would simply not work.

As a well-experienced Scrum coach once told me: “If you do…


You can use various methods to estimate work items in Agile processes. One of the most popular methods is Planning Poker®, which has proven to be an easy-to-use tool. James Grenning developed it and Mike Cohn of Mountain Goat Software has popularized it. You can read more about alternative estimation tools in “9 Agile Estimation Techniques.”

The best version of the tool is one that allows the whole team to gather around a table, pass out physical card decks, put on your poker faces, and start. But it’s likely that today’s Agile teams are distributed, so physical poker decks can…

Kai-Thomas Krause

Entrepreneur / Advisor / Coach / Author — always up to new challenges and thoughts

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